Wilder, Fury draw in epic heavyweight showdown

Wilder, Fury draw in epic heavyweight showdown

Wilder, Fury draw in epic heavyweight showdown

Saturday night in Los Angeles, one of the biggest heavyweight showdowns in recent memory will take place. The showdown between Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury had no victor as one judge said Fury won, one said Wilder, and the third ruled it a draw. Yes he could last all 12 rounds, with the fight going to a split decision draw, but no he couldn't avoid Wilder's biggest shots as the Brit was twice sent to the canvas.

Wilder's reach has been measured at 210.8cm, somewhat shorter than Fury's 215.9cm reach. ESPN.com scored it 114-112 for Wilder, who retained his belt for the eighth time. He came close, dropping Fury in the ninth round and again in the final round, but Fury showed the same kind of heart that helped him overcome the nightmare of the past three years since he won three major titles and the lineal title three years ago this week in a monumental upset of longtime champion Wladimir Klitschko.

"If it goes the distance then it belongs to Tyson Fury", Lewis said.

The consensus was that Fury outboxed Wilder despite his 12th round knockdown
The consensus was that Fury outboxed Wilder despite his 12th round knockdown

At the end of the fight, Fury paid tribute to Wilder, whom he called the "second best heavyweight in the world" after himself, and expressing relative delight at his achievement of managing a draw on foreign soil in spite of the two knockdowns.

Wilder, having successfully defended his title, said he hoped for a rematch, either in the United Kingdom or U.S., and also extended the same gratitude to Fury for a fight that will surely live long in the memory. In a frantic, extraordinary twelfth round, one of the most wonderful in boxing history, Fury was knocked down and seemed to be out, but somehow rose to his feet once more and was the aggressor as the final bell sounded.

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