Rocket heads to International Space Station with Christmas dinner for crew members

Rocket heads to International Space Station with Christmas dinner for crew members

Rocket heads to International Space Station with Christmas dinner for crew members

Two days after launching a rocket carrying 64 satellites from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Hawthorne-based SpaceX will attempt Wednesday to launch a resupply mission to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral in Florida.

SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk issued several tweets about the anomaly, including video of the stage slowly settling on the water and then tipping over. "Recovery ship dispatched", Musk wrote, latter adding: "We may use it for an internal SpaceX mission".

It seems that once the stalled fin extended fully, the rocket nearly regained control and came in for a landing almost like normal, but off target, in the water. SpaceX engineers were less happy with the first-stage booster which dropped into the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, missing its designated landing zone on ground. Hans claimed that the water landing was pretty much smooth and today's incident showed how SpaceX's rocket are created to save itself in case if anything goes wrong. The private space company has altogether recouped 32 boosters after lift-offs. He did not know if it could be reused. Instead, it made an nearly ideal landing on the ocean about two miles offshore. He told the media that public safety was protected well here.

The disappointment was offset by the successful flight of the Dragon capsule and its 5,600 pounds (2,500 kilograms) of cargo.

It is expected to reach the ISS on Saturday.

"What a great day for a launch", said Kennedy Space Center director Bob Cabana.

SPACEX yesterday blasted off its unmanned Dragon cargo ship, loaded with supplies, science experiments and food for the astronauts living at the International Space Station but failed to successfully land its booster afterwards.

Apart from the turkey breast and the other Christmas dinner items, the cargo also includes 36,000 worms and 40 mice to carry out ageing as well as muscle studies.

Researchers expect a tenfold increase in the worm population. It turns out their muscles are similar to ours in structure and function, making them flawless lab substitutes, said lead scientist Timothy Etheridge of the University of Exeter in England.

The launch was initially scheduled for Tuesday, but was delayed due to *checks note* moldy mouse food. A fresh stock of food was brought in for them from California.

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