Video Released Of The Gender Reveal Party That Caused Massive Wildfire

Video Released Of The Gender Reveal Party That Caused Massive Wildfire

Video Released Of The Gender Reveal Party That Caused Massive Wildfire

The US Forest Service released video footage this week in which a gender-reveal gag is shown to be the cause for the Sawmill Fire that resulted in $8.2 million worth of damage for the state of Arizona in 2017. Upon impact, the target was to burst and reveal a cloud of either pink or blue colored smoke, meant to show the gender of the agent's baby-to-be.

He also agreed to conduct a public service announcement with the U.S. Forest Service about the cause of the fire.

"Start packing up, start packing up", a man can be heard yelling as the blue cloud turned into flames.

Dennis Dickey started a $8.2 million fire at a gender reveal party.

But for more than a year, the U.S. Forest Service refused to release the video of the genesis of a fire the size of American Samoa.

Dickey told authorities he constructed the target with an explosive substance known as Tannerite. He added: "I feel absolutely disgusting about it".

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The off-duty border patrol agent said he was trying to surprise his family with the gender of his wife's unborn child.

He reported it immediately. "It was probably one of the worst days of my life.", Dickey said.

The Sawmill Fire burned almost 47,000 acres owned by the state of Arizona and various federal agencies, and caused more than $8 million in damage.

It then explodes emitting a blue gaseous plume - lighting the grass on fire. He will spend five years on probation and has agreed to pay restitution totaling $8,188,069, the US attorney's office said in a news release.

It quickly spread to the Coronado National Forest.

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