MEXICO BORDER: Trump deploys 5,200 soldiers over migrant influx

MEXICO BORDER: Trump deploys 5,200 soldiers over migrant influx

MEXICO BORDER: Trump deploys 5,200 soldiers over migrant influx

General Terrence O'Shaughnessy, the head of U.S. Northern Command, defended the operation at a briefing on Tuesday.

But any migrants who complete the long trek to the southern US border already face major hurdles - both physical and bureaucratic - to being allowed into the United States.

Military police units are also being deployed. They will also have use of helicopters with night-vision capabilities and sensors. We're going to hold them, we're going to build tent cities, we're gonna build tents all over the place.

The move represents a massive military build-up along the border, where some 2,000 National Guardsmen are already working to provide help to overwhelmed authorities.

Kevin McAleenan, the top USA border security official, said the decision to send troops was not motivated by electoral politics but rather was a law enforcement necessity, as US agents prepare for the possibility that crowds of migrants will amass and turn unruly.

While The New American reported last week that Mexican authorities were escorting the "carvan" through the country, they at least stopped them temporarily on Saturday.

"We are preparing for the contingency of large groups of arriving persons in the next several weeks", he said.

The two groups combined represent just a few days' worth of the average flow of migrants to the United States, and similar ones have occurred regularly over the years, passing largely unnoticed.

A new group of Central American migrants wade in mass across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018.

A possible announcement by Trump on other border measures had been tentatively slated for Tuesday, administration officials had said, but he is instead traveling to Pittsburgh, where a gunman massacred 11 people at a synagogue Saturday in what is believed to be the deadliest attack on Jews in USA history.

Officials at the time said Mattis' authorization did not include a specific number of troops, something that would be determined at a later point.

A possible announcement by Mr Trump on the other border measures had been tentatively slated for Tuesday, administration officials said, but he is instead travelling to Pittsburgh, where a gunman massacred 11 people at a synagogue on Saturday in what is believed to be the deadliest attack on Jews in U.S. history.

Trump reiterated that he wanted to set up "tent cities" to hold people coming to the US, including those seeking asylum. He said border agents will act with the highest respect for the law and will treat people as humanely as possible. We will, if necessary, to increase the number of military.

The Pentagon last week approved a request for additional troops at the southern border. The deployment has been named "Operation Faithful Patriot".

The U.S. military will be sending 5,000 support troops to the U.S. -Mexico border, the Pentagon announced on Monday.

The troops will be armed - "they are in fact deploying with weapons" - but their mission will be to back up CBP in law enforcement, he said.

US President Donald Trump has taken a hard line toward the first caravan, threatening to deploy Army troops along the border to prevent entry and saying he will significantly cut economic aid to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador in reprisal for their inability to halt the caravans.

The U.S. military has already begun delivering jersey barriers to the southern border in conjunction with the deployment plans. Combined command posts will be established to integrate USA military and CBP efforts. O'Shaughnessy did not have a timetable for when the active duty forces would be sent to areas directly along the border. Earlier Monday, Trump tweeted accusations about the caravan without citing any evidence.

"Many Gang Members and some very bad people are mixed into the Caravan heading to our Southern Border", Mr Trump tweeted.

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