Hurricane Florence looks absolutely wild from the International Space Station

Hurricane Florence looks absolutely wild from the International Space Station

Hurricane Florence looks absolutely wild from the International Space Station

Hurricane Florence is blowing sustained winds of up to 130 miles per hour as it barrels toward the US East Coast as a Category 4 storm.

A new high-definition video and photos taken from the International Space Station show the size of scope of Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm heading toward landfall in the Southeast U.S. later this week.

Hurricane Florence, the first major hurricane in the Atlantic basin this season, will be slamming into the Eastern United States this week as a Category 4 hurricane.

The video also includes still images from NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold, who photographed the storm from the ISS.

On the forecast track, the center of Florence will move over the southwestern Atlantic Ocean between Bermuda and the Bahamas Tuesday and Wednesday, and approach the coast of SC or North Carolina on Thursday.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst snapped some photos of his own to share on Twitter on Wednesday.

"Hurricane Florence may now be dipping a bit south and hitting a portion of the Great State of Georgia", he wrote.

NASA called the footage "a stark and sobering view" of the storm.

An image taken by NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold of Hurricane Florence in the Atlantic Ocean, approaching the Carolinas on September 12, 2018.

The hurricane, which has already caused several Week 3 college football games to be rescheduled, postponed or canceled, is expected to make landfall sometime this weekend.

The NHC says the storm may push a "life-threatening" surge of seawater ashore into these and other areas.

When the space station flew over the storm's menacing eye, Gerst took this photo.

About 1.7 million people in North and SC and Virginia were under warnings to evacuate.

NASA's Aqua satellite used its Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer to capture this data.

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