White House defends decision to bar reporter from press event

White House defends decision to bar reporter from press event

White House defends decision to bar reporter from press event

Two White House officials, Bill Shine and Sarah Sanders, told Collins that she asked "inappropriate" questions during Trump's meeting with European Commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker. The White House Correspondents Association often fought with his administration over the matter.

"First of all, just step back for a second and contemplate the notion that anybody associated with President Trump thinking that a reporter is rude".

The president had previously tweeted his frustration with Cohen, writing, "What kind of lawyer would tape a client?"

"Could you ask her if we ever used the word ban?" he asked. Collins was the pool reporter, representing the TV networks during the Oval Office event.

On his visit to the UK, Mr Trump attacked an article in The Sun on the same grounds, although retracted his statement after speaking to a reporter from the paper.

Shine, the former co-president of Fox News, joined the White House as deputy chief of staff for communications last month.

The White House on Thursday defended its decision to bar a CNN correspondent from attending an open press event but contended it had nothing to do with the questions she asked.

Collins, who referred questions to CNN representatives, detailed the episode on CNN, prompting anchor Wolf Blitzer to say the White House should issue a formal apology.

CNN anchor Jake Tapper is done with the hypocritical way President Donald Trump's White House deals with the media.

Journalists will be watching to see if Wednesday's action by the White House was a one-off, or the start of a new and even more hostile stance toward the press corps. "This type of retaliation is wholly inappropriate, wrong-headed, and weak". Just because the White House is uncomfortable with a question regarding the news of the day doesn't mean the question isn't relevant and shouldn't be asked.

The president gets the publicity he wants - footage, say, of his hand-shake with another head of state or signing key legislation into law.

CNN's Jeff Zeleny pointed out on Twitter that asking questions is what reporters do every day.

In a video clip from the meeting, Collins can be heard asking the President, "Did Michael Cohen betray you?", "Do you worry about what Michael Cohen is going to say to prosecutors?", "Are you anxious about what is on the other tapes?", and "Why has Vladimir Putin not accepted your invitation?".

Shine, who was ousted as co-president of Fox News a year ago over his handling of sexual harassment allegations, joined the White House as deputy chief of staff for communications earlier this month.

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