What North Korea actually said in last week's statement

What North Korea actually said in last week's statement

What North Korea actually said in last week's statement

US President Donald Trump has released a letter from Kim Jong-un in which the North Korean leader voices confidence in efforts to end their nuclear stand-off while urging the US leader to take "practical steps" to build trust.

U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un walk together before their working lunch during their summit at the Capella Hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, Singapore June 12, 2018.

South Korean media also reported that the North Koreans didn't show up, citing government officials.

On June 23, the U.S. Forces Korea said that it had moved 100 wooden "temporary transit cases" to the border to prepare for the remains' delivery.

A statement, by an unnamed foreign ministry official, gave a starkly different account from one provided just hours before by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who attended the talks.

But Kim apparently changed his mind after both Moon and Trump brought up the abduction issue in their respective talks, opting to see whether Japan would be willing accept its probe findings. About 100 wooden transport cases were sent to the DMZ in recent weeks to prepare for receiving USA troop remains.

North Korea did not take kindly to the content of Pompeo's visit, which covered what the US definition of denuclearization is and what would be needed for sanctions relief.

North Korean negotiators failed to show up for scheduled talks with the U.S.at Panmunjeom, Thursday, on repatriating the remains of USA soldiers killed in the 1950-53 Korean War, indicating a possible rift between the two countries in ongoing denuclearization talks.

The remains of some U.S. soldiers were last returned in 2007, when then-New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson visited Pyongyang.

"President Trump committed to provide security guarantees to the DPRK, and Chairman Kim Jong Un reaffirmed his firm and unwavering commitment to complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula". Roughly 5,300 United States troops presumed to have been killed in the Korean war are unaccounted for.

But the North Korean leader never showed up during Pompeo's three-day visit.

But following the meeting, North Korea released a statement calling the meeting "regrettable" and accusing the USA of using "gangster-like" tactics to push it towards nuclear disarmament.

While reports stated the return would not involve payment, other than reimbursement for the costs incurred in recovering and repatriating the remains, reference to payments may have displeased Pyongyang.

Kim praises the significance of their meeting and the joint statement they put out, but the letter doesn't do much to support Trump's claim that progress is being made in his stated goal of denuclearizing North Korea.

"We got back our great fallen heroes, the remains sent back today, already 200 got sent back", Trump said at a Minnesota rally last month.

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