Tropical Depression develops in the Atlantic

Tropical Depression develops in the Atlantic

Tropical Depression develops in the Atlantic

"Just because they go through one hurricane doesn't mean they will go through a second one".

Following Tropical Storm Alberto, which developed during Memorial Day weekend, there were no tropical storms over the Atlantic basin during June for the first time since 2014, AccuWeather reported.

An Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft dispatched into the center of the storm found that sustained winds are near 40 mph, and extend up to 60 miles from the center of the storm.

The Caribbean should see fewer storms, and the chance of a major hurricane hitting the region is significantly less than it was when the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season began.

As of 1:30 p.m., the system had maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour and was moving westward at 16 miles per hour.

"While we don't expect a direct hit to take place on Puerto Rico, even some of those outer bands. have the potential to knock out power" on the USA territory, where Maria triggered months of power outages, CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said.

The NHC's forecast discussion advises, however, that Beryl's small size means "there is greater uncertainty than usual regarding Beryl's intensity forecast". Some development of this system is possible during the next day or two while it moves westward at 10 to 15 miles per hour over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

Tropical Storm Beryl is moving rapidly westward toward the Lesser Antilles at the eastern entrance of the Caribbean Sea.

Although Beryl has lost strength and is expected to gradually weaken, forecasters said it will produce strong winds and heavy rainfall across the Leeward Islands, the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola through Tuesday.

A tropical storm warning was in place in Dominica, replacing an earlier hurricane watch, and Guadeloupe. Anything more than that is considered a tropical storm.

The third named storm of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season formed off the coast of North Carolina on Sunday, as forecasters warned beachgoers of potentially risky surf in the days ahead. It's expected to strengthen into a tropical storm and possibly a hurricane, but should stay well offshore with no impact to the U.S. East Coast. The Atlantic season typically peaks between late August and September, however late season storms are not uncommon.

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