Tom Wolfe, the father of New Journalism, dies aged 88

Tom Wolfe, the father of New Journalism, dies aged 88

Tom Wolfe, the father of New Journalism, dies aged 88

Tom Wolfe, the debonair essayist and author of landmark non-fiction and novels including The Right Stuff and Bonfire Of The Vanities, who also helped create the immersive New Journalism literary movement, has died. Wolfe was associated with other New Journalism writers like Hunter S. Thompson, Joan Didion and Truman Capote.

His first work of fiction turned out to be his most famous, the bestseller The Bonfire of the Vanities, an epic satire on social class, ambition, racism, politics and greed in 1980s NY.

Later, Wolfe published his first novel, "The Bonfire of the Vanities", in 1987, which was adapted into a film by Brian De Palma in 1990.

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968) chronicled the rise of the hippy generation, while Radical Chic (1970) mocked the pretensions of Manhattan liberals and The Painted Word (1975) those of the art world.

In his space-race classic The Right Stuff - the American Book Award victor - he combined the emotional impact of a novel with the factual foundation of hard reporting.

Wolfe was also famous for his dapper "Southern gentleman" look, often appearing in public in a pristine white suit, white homburg hat, and two-tone shoes. It was made into a film in 1983 that lost money at the box office - perhaps due to its more than three-hour run time - but was a critical and Oscar-winning hit that was included in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry five years ago. "And one ... coming up is on political correctness, which I think is the funniest subject in a long - in a long, long time", Wolfe said.

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