Officials warn about possible mumps exposure at Dallas cheerleading event

Officials warn about possible mumps exposure at Dallas cheerleading event

Officials warn about possible mumps exposure at Dallas cheerleading event

Chris Van Deusen, a spokesman for the Texas Department of State Health Services, said a person with a confirmed case of mumps attended the National Cheerleaders Association All-Star National Championship at the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas from February 23-25.

Texas health officials have cautioned up to a huge number of cheerleaders that they may have been presented to the mumps a month ago at a national rivalry in Dallas.

That's according to reports from Dallas' WFAA and the Washington Post, which said Wednesday that the Department of State Health Services has issued a letter indicating that an out-of-state competitor had the viral illness during the event. Texas Department of State Health Services sent letters to everyone who attended the competition to alert them to the disease.

Mumps is a virus that is spread by coughing, sneezing and direct contact with saliva, like eating or drinking after an infected person. Symptoms usually occur between 16 and 18 days after exposure. The virus can also be spread by sharing cups and utensils.

Mumps is an infectious infection that makes the salivary organs in the face end up swollen, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A total of 130 mumps infections were reported in 25 states between January 1-27, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The health department said most people develop symptoms two weeks after contracting the virus. Infected people without symptoms may still be able to transmit the virus. However, pregnant women or people who are immunocompromised should not receive the MMR vaccine. And no Texas residents have developed mumps in connection with the case. Adults who have not had two doses of MMR vaccine can receive the vaccine.

Vaccination is the best protection against the mumps, the health department says, but vaccinated individuals can still become infected.

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