A single cigarette can trigger smoking addiction, says study

A single cigarette can trigger smoking addiction, says study

A single cigarette can trigger smoking addiction, says study

A recent study into cigarette use suggests that the majority of people who try smoking could be hooked on tobacco after lighting up just one time.

We know cigarettes are extremely addictive, but the science on how quickly nicotine can draw you in has been mixed.

After all the times that doctors have warned about the negative effects provoked by cigarettes, people keep smoking them often.

Based on survey results from 4 different countries - including the United Kingdom - the findings highlight how addictive tobacco cigarettes are, and the importance of ensuring that stop smoking services are made available to help people quit. An average of 60 percent of the more than 200,000 respondents had smoked a cigarette - and almost 69 percent of the nicotine-curious eventually formed a daily habit. He also stated that this is the first time where the link between trying the first cigarette and becoming a regular smoker presented in a large data set.

The findings, which were published in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, are striking.

Linda Bauld, professor of health policy at the University of Stirling, said the study highlighted the importance of preventing smoking in the first place. Three of the surveys were conducted in the U.S. between 2001 and 2013, another three in the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2014, one in Australia in 2013 and another in New Zealand in 2009. Among them, almost 68.9% reported that they had progressed to smoking daily. During the same period, 19.3% of 18-to-24-year-olds used to smoke compared to 25.8% in 2010.

If you have a circle of friends and anyone around you who are daily smokers, then you might have thought to give it a try once for sure.

But, in 2016 it had gone down to 15.5 per cent which is around 7.6 million people.

"Tobacco use starts in childhood for two-thirds of smokers in the United Kingdom, and this study suggests that even trying a cigarette becomes regular use in most cases", she added.

However, Deborah Arnott, chief executive of the charity Action on Smoking and Health, believes the government should make more stringent rules to regulate tobacco sales.

"The government is refusing to introduce licensing for tobacco retailers, even though there is strong support for this both from the public and retailers", she said.

Steve Brine said that smoking in Britain is at an "all-time low".

"We recently launched a new tobacco control plan to map the path to a smoke-free generation and are working to educate people about the risks and support them to quit for good".

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