Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Special Counsel Robert Mueller has spent more than $3.2 million in the opening months of his federal criminal investigation into Russian interference in last year's us election and whether President Donald Trump or anyone close to him colluded in it.

"No subpoena has been issued or received", White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a briefing.

Sekulow was responding to a report from German business newspaper Handelsblatt that Mueller had subpoenaed records from Deutsche Bank as part of his investigation into possible Russian involvement in the USA presidential election campaign. U.S. investigators are demanding that it provide information on dealings linked to the Trumps, sources familiar with the matter told Handelsblatt.

In a court filing, prosecutors say the attempt to publish an op-ed appeared to violate an admonishment from the judge last month to refrain from public statements. He had reached a tentative agreement with the government.

Although limited in detail, the spending report offers the first insight into the scope and scale of Mueller's investigation, which has resulted so far in criminal charges against four people who worked on Trump's presidential campaign.

Deutsche Bank, which is one of the Trump Organisation's major lenders on its real estate projects, said it would not comment on any of its clients.

The money was spent between mid-May, when the investigation began, and September 30 of this year. The Department of Justice spent another $3.5 million to support the investigation.

The Mueller probe also spent $157,339 for a variety of contractual services - $111,245 for information technology, $24,456 for transcription and $17,217 for building services.

The special counsel also spent $223,643 on travel, nearly entirely for staffers who temporary relocated to the investigation's headquarters in Washington.

For example, Patrick Fitzgerald was a special counsel who investigated a far narrower subject: a leak that exposed the identity of covert Central Intelligence Agency officer Valerie Plame.

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