Russia Tried to Pass off a Video Game as Combat Footage

Russia Tried to Pass off a Video Game as Combat Footage

Russia Tried to Pass off a Video Game as Combat Footage

"However, the US command's refusal to carry out strikes on the convoys of ISIL terrorists retreating from Albu Kamal on November 9 is an objective fact reflected in the transcripts of the talks and therefore, fully known to the USA side", Interfax news agency quoted the ministry as saying on Tuesday.

But the monitor Conflict Intelligence Team (CIT), along with a number of social media users, was quick to compare one of the images with an identical still from the wargame "AC-130 Gunship Simulator: Special Ops Squadron". As you'd expect from someone caught with their trousers down, the original tweets and Facebook posts have since been deleted, but once you post something on the Internet it's there forever.

The ministry said an employee had mistakenly attached the photo.

The video game image seems to be taken from a promotional video on the game's website and YouTube channel, closely cropped to omit the game controls and on-screen information.

Researchers at Conflict Intelligence Team, a nonprofit group that investigates Russian military activities, subsequently reported that three other images shared by Russia as "irrefutable evidence" of us forces assisting the Islamic State were actually taken from video released by the Iraqi Ministry of Defense in 2016.

The evidence was "irrefutable", the Russian defense ministry claimed: The US is supporting ISIS.

Hours later, the ministry published an updated statement with a different set of images, which it also said proved their claims.

The original is consistent with a June 2016 Iraqi military video, which shows coalition airstrikes and Iraqi military forces attacking an ISIS convoy fleeing Falluja.

"The defense ministry is looking into a civilian employee of one of the departments who attached photos to the defense ministry's statement by mistake", a new statement was quoted by Russian agencies as saying.

The ministry posted a number of aerial images that it claimed were of ISIS convoys, It said the U.S. intervened to "use (ISIS) to promote American interests in Middle East".

Coalition spokesman Col. Ryan Dillon called those claims, "about as accurate as their air campaign".

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