Federal Bureau of Investigation data shows hate crimes appeared to drop in Wisconsin

Federal Bureau of Investigation data shows hate crimes appeared to drop in Wisconsin

Federal Bureau of Investigation data shows hate crimes appeared to drop in Wisconsin

Wisconsin reported 34 hate crimes past year.

The FBI's annual hate crime statistics, released Monday, showed there were 6,121 hate crime incidents in 2016, up 4.6 percent from 5,850 in 2015.

Minnesota reported 119 hate crimes past year, up from 109 in 2015.

Hate crimes in the United States increased by nearly five percent in 2016, when the country registered 6,121 acts of this type, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) announced today.

They also rose steadily quarter by the quarter previous year to hit 1,747 in the final three months of 2016. These agencies provided from one to 12 months' worth of data about bias-motivated crime, and of those agencies, 1,776 reported one or more incidents.

In releasing the figures, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said hate crimes remain the "number one investigative priority" of its civil rights unit and pledged to continue collecting data on the problem. A number of these reports have turned out to be false.

There were also 105 incidents against transgender people, a 44 percent increase compared to 2015.

"The Department of Justice is committed to ensuring that individuals can live without fear of being a victim of violent crime based on who they are, what they believe, or how they worship", Sessions said in a statement. Hate incidents increased from 203 in 2015 to 285 in 2016.

Of those crimes a year ago, 25 were motivated by race, two by religion, and 12 by sexual orientation. Anti-Jewish hate crimes, anti-Islamic hate crimes, and anti-Catholic hate crimes all saw various increases in 2016.

An unrelated report released in February found the number of hate groups in the U.S. Incidents targeting Muslims rose 19 percent from 257 to 307 incidents. Crimes motivated by bias against Protestants and Eastern Orthodox Christians both declined.

Another 21.0 percent were for religion, and 17.7 percent sexual orientation.

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