FCC confirms plan to kill net neutrality

FCC confirms plan to kill net neutrality

FCC confirms plan to kill net neutrality

The rules, which the commission is expected to vote on at its December 14 meeting, would replace those Open Internet or Net neutrality rules, which prevented Internet service providers (ISPs) from blocking or throttling legal content users sought to access, as well as preventing ISPs from accepting payment to prioritize some data.

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is following through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations created to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally. His proposal will be released on November 22, and the FCC commissioners will vote on the order in December. "If a service provider can block you from seeing certain content or can make you pay extra for it, that hurts all of us and we should have rules against it". "Instead, the FCC would simply require Internet service providers to be transparent about their practices so that consumers can buy the service plan that's best for them and entrepreneurs and other small businesses can have the technical information they need to innovate".

"Net neutrality is the idea that the internet should be free and open for everyone", said Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg.

During President Barack Obama's tenure, the then head of F.C.C Tom Wheeler said that the rules were vital as they prevented companies such as Verizon to low down the operations of services like Netflix.

With a Republican majority on the FCC, passage of the proposed rules is nearly certain.

Under current laws, internet service providers must treat all internet content equally. Pai, a Republican, was installed by President Donald Trump.

If the ownership cap is eased, as expected, by the Republican-controlled, 5-member commission, it would be a boost to Sinclair Broadcast Group as it looks to close its $3.9 billion purchase of Tribune Media.

AT&T, Comcast and Verizon have said that repealing the rules could lead to billions of dollars in additional broadband investment and eliminate the possibility that a future presidential administration could regulate internet pricing. That's good for shareholders, he said, but not good for consumers, who might see higher costs passed through to them.

- FCC is expected to share the full text of its plans tomorrow, just a day before Thanksgiving, hoping that not many eyes will catch the bad news. While tech companies such as Google and Amazon support the rules claiming that without them, broadband will regulate the content received by the consumers, broadband feels that the regulations hold their business at ransom.

Consumers Union called the proposal "an enormous loss for consumers" that "would give internet service providers more power and control over the websites we can visit". In the same way, numerous signature companies in Silicon Valley think the internet should be open to all on an equal basis.

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