Facebook wants Canadians to send them their nudes to combat revenge porn

Facebook wants Canadians to send them their nudes to combat revenge porn

Facebook wants Canadians to send them their nudes to combat revenge porn

Facebook is trying to fight revenge porn by encouraging users in Australia to submit their nude photos to prevent them from being shared without their consent. He questions how Facebook will protect that uploaded image from hackers.

The site said by having your nude photo, they can use a recognition algorithm to make sure the same image is never uploaded again by anyone else.

The nude program is now being tested in Australia, with e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant revealing in an interview with ABC that she's fully on board with the scheme.

The social media network, Facebook, is combating "revenge porn" in a very unique way in Australia.

Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety, said the system is being trialled in the UK, US, Australia and Canada.

She explained: "Revenge porn is becoming such a huge epidemic among young people, it's absolutely awful and if there's any way to tackle it then we should take that seriously".

Facebook's customer support team will then review a blurred version of the image to ensure that it is explicit, and then "hash" it before it is deleted.

"We're using image-matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared."
The company considered blurring out images before they ended up in the hands of human reviewers, but decided against it because that may have resulted in accidentally hashing legitimate images.

"We've been participating in the Global Working Group to identify new solutions to keep people safe, and we're proud to partner with Facebook on this important initiative as it aims to empower Australians to stop image-based abuse in its tracks", said Julie Inman Grant, Australia's eSafety Commissioner.

"This pilot has the potential to disable the control and power perpetrators hold over victims, particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion, and the subsequent harm that could come to them", said Grant in a news release.

It will then be up to the sender to delete the image.

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