Facebook anti-revenge porn test "remembers" users' nude photos

Facebook anti-revenge porn test

Facebook anti-revenge porn test "remembers" users' nude photos

Facebook is trialling a system to prevent revenge porn by asking users to send in naked images and videos of themselves.

Would you voluntarily send Facebook nude photos of yourself? If someone tries to later upload the same image to the social media site, Facebook will recognize the fingerprint and stop them.

Facebook and other technology companies use this photo-matching technology to tackle other forms of banned content, including child sex abuse and extremist imagery.

Facebook's customer support team will then review a blurred version of the image to ensure it's explicit, then "hash" it before deletion.

First, you upload an explicit image of yourself to Facebook Messenger (you can do so by starting a conversation with yourself).

Julie Inman Grant, Austrailian eSafety Commissioner, says the program has the potential to disable the "control and power perpetrators hold over victims", particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion.

Facebook is now testing the system - starting in Australia, but spreading to other parts of the world - but it's not really clear how willing potential revenge porn victims will be to go along with the scheme.

This nude photo inoculation program is now being tested in Australia, with the support and blessing of Australian e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant.

eSafety Commissioner Inman Grant told the Australian Broadcasting Company that Facebook is not storing these images but are using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies to prevent the image from being posted. People often capture images or video of their intimate acts either consensually or discreetly.

The program would then prevent another user from uploading the same photo.

"I literally recover deleted images from computer systems all day - off disk and out of system memory". It was even the topic of a Netflix documentary titled, "Revenge Porn".

According to a 2016 study by the Data & Society Research Institute, One in 25 Americans has been a victim of threats or posts of almost nude or nude images without their permission. There was technology that could find exact matches of images, but abusers could get around this by slightly altering the files - either by changing their size or adding a small mark.

This is not the first attempt by the social media giant to combat the increasing menace of revenge porn.

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