Even Moderate Alcohol Intake Increases Your Risk Of Cancer, Study Says

Even Moderate Alcohol Intake Increases Your Risk Of Cancer, Study Says

Even Moderate Alcohol Intake Increases Your Risk Of Cancer, Study Says

In a statement released Tuesday, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) outlined research tying alcohol to two types of cancer and told Americans to drink less.

In fact, ASCO reports that women who drank even one drink of beer or wine (which have significantly lower alcohol contents than liquors) were five percent more likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer, and nine percent more likely to develop the cancer after menopause.

"The more you drink, the higher the risk", said Dr. Clifford A. Hudis, the chief executive of ASCO.

The team of researchers also reported that, around 5.5 per cent from all new cases of cancers and 5.8 per cent of total cancer deaths in 2012, could be globally attributed as drinking alcohol.

As of 2013, about 73 per cent of Americans reported consuming alcohol, and almost 13 per cent described their consumption habits as binge drinking, according to a survey published in JAMA Psychiatry in August.

"ASCO believes that a proactive stance by the Society to minimize excessive exposure to alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention", the statement, which was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, said.

The group warns that heavy drinkers have an increased risk of developing liver cancer, mouth cancer, throat cancer, colorectal cancers and cancer of the voicebox. While it is okay to drink occasionally (read rarely), you shouldn't be making a habit out of it. The group likewise opposes "pink washing", in which alcohol companies drape their products in pink ribbon to enhance sales, a practice it opposes "given the consistent evidence that shows the link between alcohol consumption and an increased risk of breast cancer". The study's authors said their findings indicated "a public health crisis", especially with the increase in problem drinking among its more than 43,000 participants.

"It's good to look at where you are with diet and physical activity and look at places where you might improve and just start every day to take some simple steps to decrease your risk and improve your health", Bender said.

"With alcohol we are not saying don't drink ever. Don't start.' This is a little more subtle".

With liver cancer, alcohol leads to cirrhosis and cirrhosis, in turn, leads to cancer, but it's not always such a clear chain reaction. "It is really the heavy drinkers over a long period of time that we need to worry about", she said.

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