Tropical Storm Nate Expected to Develop Wednesday in Western Caribbean

Tropical Storm Nate Expected to Develop Wednesday in Western Caribbean

Tropical Storm Nate Expected to Develop Wednesday in Western Caribbean

The second tropical wave we're monitoring, Invest 90-L, has a much better chance of developing into a tropical system and will most likely form into Tropical Storm Nate by the weekend. The system is expected to become a tropical storm later today or tonight.

Check The Palm Beach Post's live storm tracking map.

"Any tropical system in this area is likely to drift in a general northward direction, which will take it over the Gulf of Mexico by this weekend", according to AccuWeather Hurricane Expert Dan Kottlowski.

Therefore, future "Nate" is expected to be pulled north into the Gulf of Mexico, steered by the combination of upper-level high pressure centered near or east of the Bahamas and what is known as a Central American gyre. Sixteen-E may intensify further before reaching 23.5N 87.0W Saturday morning, then making landfall as hurricane on the western Florida Panhandle Sunday.

The NHC issued its first public advisory about the storm, which has been dubbed Tropical Depression 16, on Wednesday.

Wednesday's depression becomes the 16th cyclone in a record-breaking season that hit feverish intensity over the last two months with five named storms since August 30.

Hurricane hunters could be sent to investigate the system on Wednesday afternoon, forecasters said. "This tends to be a hot spot thanks to relatively low wind shear and very warm sea surface temperatures", said Storm Team 8 Meteorologist Ed Bloodsworth.

The main impacts, there, will include bands of locally heavy rain, elevated surf, and some stronger wind gusts. As stated above, it is simply too early to be specific and this could easily change.

An average Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June 1 to November 30, produces 12 named storms, of which six become hurricanes, including three major hurricanes, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Stay with WDSU.com for updates.

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