Lavrov says Tehran abides by all commitments on Iran nuclear deal

Lavrov says Tehran abides by all commitments on Iran nuclear deal

Lavrov says Tehran abides by all commitments on Iran nuclear deal

Worldwide inspectors say Iran is in technical compliance with the accord, but Trump says Tehran is in violation of the spirit of the agreement and has done nothing to rein in its ballistic missile program or its financial and military support for Hezbollah and other extremist groups.

In addition, Trump could at any time decide not to waive the nuclear-related sanctions again - a decision he must make every 120 days under US law. "We thought it was the wrong decision", Cardin told reporters recently.

He called Trump's move to kick the deal to Congress a "trap" and "a tactic meant to reach the president's goal of tearing the deal apart".

It is also expected that the Trump administration could announce a fresh set of sanctions, possibly non-nuclear, against the Middle East nation like penalties against Iran's ballistic missile programme. Engel, the top Democrat on the Foreign Affairs Committee, said unwinding the agreement would send a unsafe signal to allies and adversaries alike.

Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told the Senate Armed Services Committee last week that Iran "is not in material breach of the agreement". With the threat of restoring those old sanctions and imposing new ones - as well as the threat of military force - the US hopes to have new leverage and get Iran to accept changes to the deal.

Instead, these officials said Mr Trump is more inclined to throw the matter to Congress and push legislators to amend the law that requires the president to certify Iran's compliance every 90 days.

The White House is seeking to extend or eliminate the expiration date for so-called "sunset" provisions, which limit the amount of uranium Iran is allowed to enrich.

Speaking at an global conference on enhancing nuclear safety in Rome, Salehi said that Washington's recent "delusionary negative postures do not augur well" for keeping the deal intact. "We may have to array our forces to prepare for. calibrated strikes".

The certification would also demand that the intelligence community produce judgments on a wide range of Iranian behaviour that is not covered by the nuclear deal, including ballistic missile testing and development, support for Lebanon's Hezbollah movement and Syrian President Bashar Assad and threats to Israel and the Mideast more broadly, according to the drafts.

"There is no technical nor political space to renegotiate this deal", Federica Mogherini, the EU's High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, told PBS Wednesday.

Iran has said it is open in principle to further discussions, particularly with Europe, but has said its missile programme is non-negotiable. It could come up for a vote in the full House well before the end of the 60 days Congress has to react to Trump's announcement.

Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump greets Senator Bob Corker (R-TN) at a campaign rally in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., July 5, 2016.

Notably, the committee's top Republican, Rep. Ed Royce, said the USA should adhere to the deal. "It doesn't try and do more. that needs to be understood and recognised in Washington".

The U.S. will need to work with Britain, France and Germany - all parties to the Iran nuclear pact - to fix its flaws and those countries need to know that the U.S.is a reliable partner, according to Engel.

Trump is expected to unveil a broad strategy on confronting Iran this week, likely on Friday.

But it could be hard to get both Iran and its ally, Russia, back to the table for a new round of talks.

It also would indicate that the United States would be willing to renegotiate agreements with every new administration, giving other countries reason to hesitate on negotiations if they felt future leadership would give them a better deal, Mogherini added.

What exactly that will look like is still being determined, but it could include greater congressional oversight.

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