Katia makes landfall on Mexico's Gulf coast, weakens to tropical storm

Katia makes landfall on Mexico's Gulf coast, weakens to tropical storm

Katia makes landfall on Mexico's Gulf coast, weakens to tropical storm

Two days of satellite imagery from NASA's Terra and NOAA's GOES East satellites showed that Hurricane Katia was starting to crawl to the coast of southeastern Mexico.

Hurricane Jose and Hurricane Katia are right behind Irma.

However, the Category 4 hurricane spared the storm-hit Caribbean islands, which had already suffered at the hands of Irma.

Forecasters expect the storm to make landfall this weekend in Mexico.

Irma has the potential to cause the most damage, and the trifecta of hurricanes has experts anxious about the potential destruction from the back-to-back-to-back storms.

Travel to and from St. Martin and St. Bart was halted on Saturday with Jose closing in, while hurricane warnings put in place for Barbuda and Anguilla.

The storm is a "small tropical cyclone", the National Hurricane Center said, with hurricane-force-winds extending out only 10 miles from the center.

Maximum sustained winds are near 90 miles per hour (150 kph) with higher gusts.

The United States National Hurricane Center said that as a tropical depression, Katia was blowing maximum sustained winds of 56 km per hour as it dissipated over the mountains of central eastern Mexico by mid-morning on Saturday.

Both hurricanes formed after Hurricane Irma - a deadly category 5 storm that has become the strongest ever recorded in the Atlantic.

Tropical storm Katia strengthened into a hurricane off the Mexican coast on Wednesday - marking the first time since 2010 there has been a trio of hurricanes around the Atlantic region at the same time. A hurricane watch is in effect from Cabo Rojo to the northern border of the state. The NWS forecasts the storm will move inland, hitting the states of Tlaxcala, Puebla, and Hidalgo early Saturday.

"Everyone who lives in an area at risk of landslides must vacate their homes, because it will continue to rain, the ground is getting softer and we should not run risks", said Yunes. Texas should stay dry.

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