Irma: Hurricane sucks water from Bahamas beach in rare phenomenon

Irma: Hurricane sucks water from Bahamas beach in rare phenomenon

Irma: Hurricane sucks water from Bahamas beach in rare phenomenon

"That's as far as they see #HurricaneIrma". Most of Irma's power is coming from a confluence of the cell's unusually low pressure and the warm water in the Atlantic - the hurricane's low pressure is sucking water away from the shore.

Another Twitter user tweeted a photo of the exposed beach at a different beach in the Bahamas and showed it was back to normal within less than a day.

The force of Hurricane Irma is so strong it has sucked all sign of water away from beaches in the Bahamas as it heads towards the U.S. mainland.

Since the hurricane is so strong and its pressure is very low, it is sucking water from its surroundings and bringing it into the core of the storm. Wayne Neely, a forecaster with the Bahamas' Department of Meteorology, warned that people should stay clear of the areas where water has receded because the ocean will come back at higher levels and with great ferocity. Footage of a dry Bahamas shoreline hit the internet shortly after Irma swept through the Caribbean Islands. As the storm gobbles water towards its center, it gets pulled from its surroundings. It happened in the Bahamas on Friday and Saturday, and now it's happening on the Gulf Coast of Florida on Sunday.

The Washington Post also adds that the jarring disappearance of the ocean could be attributed to hurricane "bulge", referring to the centre of the storm being so low pressure that water is actually drawn upwards.

Irma made landfall over the Florida Keys Sunday morning as a category 4 storm.

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