UK Parliament opening date set, suggesting Tory deal reached

Britain is likely to enter arduous talks on its exit from the European Union without a deal to keep Prime Minister Theresa May in power as negotiations with a Northern Irish "kingmaker" party grind into a second week.

She is also trying to contain outrage at home over a London tower block fire which left at least 30 people dead.

The political fallout of the fire, which began late at night and trapped dozens of people in their beds, is also hurting May's Conservatives, who run the local council and have been blamed by the opposition for spending cuts that have starved budgets for building maintenance and safety checks.

"The talks are ongoing, they are very positive, they are constructive".

He said his party would oppose any deal between the British government and the DUP that undermined the 1998 accord but he said Sinn Féin would support any additional funds for the north secured in return for supporting Mrs May. There is a steady dialogue between the two sides that has never stopped at any point.

When asked if a deal was in the making, DUP leader Arlene Foster told reporters in Dublin: "I think you know it takes two to tango and we're ready to dance".

The Conservatives are still negotiating with the Democratic Unionist Party over whether their 10 MPs will support the Tories' minority government.

A source in May's Conservative Party said talks continued on Friday.

The leader of Britain's House of Commons says the state opening of Parliament will take place on June 21.

May does not necessarily need a firm deal from the DUP before opening parliament and might hope that she would receive the necessary backing anyway.

Earlier on Thursday, it was announced the uncertainty in Westminster had pushed back the Queen's Speech - when the monarch announces the Government's programme for the parliamentary session - from Monday to Wednesday next week.

"We have two weeks from today to get the Northern Ireland executive up and functioning again and to try to bring in a new chair is actually a waste of time and a distraction", he said.

Prime Minister Theresa May in March formally notified the European Union of its intention to leave, starting a two-year timetable for negotiating the exit.

Theresa May's failure to win a majority at the General Election has led to suggestions her Brexit plan to leave the EU's Single Market and Customs Union could be altered, while rival parties have demanded involvement in exit talks following the inconclusive result.

May's government has said its Brexit plans remain the same, and will be pressing for close economic ties but a clear break with the bloc to be able to control immigration and restore sovereignty over British laws.

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