Senate Judiciary Committee Probing Loretta Lynch's Interference In Clinton Email Investigation

Senate Judiciary Committee Probing Loretta Lynch's Interference In Clinton Email Investigation

Senate Judiciary Committee Probing Loretta Lynch's Interference In Clinton Email Investigation

Top Republicans and Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee involved in an investigation of former FBI director James Comey's firing, now want to know more about allegations of political interference from former Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

That campaign staffer was identified as Amanda Renteria, and the email was purportedly sent by the Democratic National Committee chair, Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Florida), to Open Society Foundation official Leonard Benardo.

Comey said Lynch's directive gave him "a queasy feeling".

"Still, the document, according to The Washington Post, factored into then-FBI Director James Comey's controversial decision to publicly announce the end of the Clinton email investigation - without discussing it in advance with Lynch", CBS News writes.

Sen. Lindsay Graham, who would have been present for classified testimony on the Russian Federation probe, has publicly stated that he doubted the purported Lynch document was fake.

Grassley and Feinstein - as well as Sens. Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C, and Ranking Member Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., also attached their names.

The existence of the Russian intelligence memo was first disclosed in April by The New York Times, which said it played a role in Comey's decision previous year to bypass the normal chain of command and make a public announcement that the Federal Bureau of Investigation was not recommending criminal charges against Clinton. "Lynch would keep the [investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server] from going too far".

Largely unreported by the news media, these questions surrounding Lynch are so serious that, in his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee this month, Comey conceded that the appointment of a special counsel in the Clinton e-mail case would have been appropriate due to his concerns about Lynch.

He told the committee that he was concerned over the former attorney general telling the FBI to refer to the Clinton investigation as a "matter," not an investigation, which resembled the Clinton campaign line. The change appeared to dovetail with how Mrs. Clinton's supporters were characterizing the probe. Read another way, it suggested that a political operative might have insight into Ms.

The Clinton campaign was terming the investigation, which was in fact an investigation, a "matter".

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