'Brexit talks to start as scheduled despite losing parliamentary majority'

'Brexit talks to start as scheduled despite losing parliamentary majority'

'Brexit talks to start as scheduled despite losing parliamentary majority'

The BBC reported DUP sources who said the talks were going well but it was thought "inappropriate" to make an announcement while events were unfolding at the Grenfell Tower in west London.

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DUP leader Arlene Foster and deputy leader Nigel Dodds arriving at 10 Downing Street for talks.

Foster will nearly certainly ask for greater investment in Northern Ireland as part of the deal, as well as guarantees on support for pension plans and for winter fuel allowances for older people.

Both parties are committed to a strengthening British unity, delivering Brexit, combating terrorism, and delivering prosperity, the source said, adding however that "at the moment there isn't a deal".

Sinn Fein's Northern Irish Assembly leader Michelle O'Neill will be among the guests, and issued a statement flagging her concerns with May over a "confidence and supply" deal with the Democratic Unionist Party.

The talks are being closely watched in European capitals as they could delay the expected start of Brexit negotiations next week, as well as change Britain's entire approach to its EU withdrawal.

Despite the uncertainty over her ability to govern, May had confirmed that Brexit negotiations - expected to be the most complex global talks Britain has held for decades - would begin as planned next week. "We never put timescales on when we expect a deal to be done and I'm not going to start now".

That border will become an external European Union border after Brexit and there have been growing fears that any border controls would have a serious economic impact on both Northern Ireland and the Republic. "That if Britain changes its mind it would find an open door", Guy Verhofstadt told the chamber. May has not yet responded to a proposal from some Conservatives for business groups and lawmakers from all parties to agree a national position on Brexit.

A Conservative Party source said it was time for the government to get on with its business.

More pressing is the issues of providing effective guarantees to some 5 million people - around 3 million European Union citizens living in Britain plus nearly 2 million Britons in Europe - who want to know what the future holds after Brexit.

"If that's not possible, the Labour Party stands ready to offer strong and stable leadership in the national interest". "The danger is that however much any government tries they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal", former Conservative prime minister John Major told BBC radio.

Yet many of her lawmakers and party members favour a sharp break with the European Union - a sign of the divisions over Europe that helped sink the premierships of May's predecessors Margaret Thatcher, John Major and Cameron. Some involved in the Irish peace process are alarmed because the 1998 Good Friday peace accords call for the British government to be neutral in the politics of Northern Ireland.

Theresa May has signalled she is "confident" of getting the Queen's Speech through the Commons whether or not a deal is reached with the Democratic Unionists (DUP) by the State Opening of Parliament next week.

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